A Simple Guide to GIFs

The moment that I log onto Tumblr and scroll through my Dashboard or watch a YouTube video, I will be bombarded with GIFs. Whether they are really depressing or super hilarious, they are everywhere. “GIF” is an acronym for “Graphic Interchange Format.” It is a type of computer image that moves as an animation, because it consists of frames, like a movie with no sound.

Who is responsible for the GIF?

This imaging format was invented in 1987 by the Internet pioneer CompuServe Corporation to help computer systems display high-quality images. Since GIFs only contain 256 colors, they are not ideal for storing digital photos, such as those captured on a digital camera. GIFs are best for images that contain simple shapes, limited color, text, and other elements.

GIFs are literally everywhere!

Social media platforms like Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter are some of the common places where GIFs are posted. They are mainly used as reactions to news headlines or conversations, even the iOS Messaging app on your iPhone allows you to use GIFs. They have become a phenomenon that will last for many years.

Why are GIFs useful?

GIFs are used for more than just entertainment. If a company wants to illustrate a product, then using these images will help their customers see things in a better way. You can also use them to create a how-to section for a website or product. Shooting several video clips of the steps and converting them into GIF animations.

Pictures speak a thousand words

We all know that reading an entire paragraph takes a lot of time to read and a lot of space on a website. So instead of spending three weeks typing out a long paragraph, you could use a GIF.

In closing

GIFs are becoming a huge part of Internet culture and have a variety of uses, whether it is using humor or creating a how-to guide for a product or website. They can capture what you want to say without using actual text.

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One thought on “A Simple Guide to GIFs

  1. Pingback: Writing for Tumblr and Facebook | Whitewater Digital Writing

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